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Ignition leads 8, 10 or 11mm? 

 

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 Post subject: Ignition leads 8, 10 or 11mm?
Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 10:30 pm 
Getting Side Ways
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Location: Castlemaine
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Hey all, just while im on the topic i thought someone might care to explain to me the benefits of big diameter, lower resistance ignition leads. And in what scenarios they would be used (also what is a good match for a stock duel fuel engine).


I assume i am not the only one who could learn a thing or two.


I've a fresh AUII 6 engine in my AUII ute, running duel fuel, just replaced the plugs with the hotter NGK's as they were fouled, still using the 8mm leads that came with the car 20 thousand km's ago. I assume 10 and 11mm leads are way excessive in my scenario, but would 10mm leads be of any benefit if i were to use them when the ones I have need replacing?

After a 5minute search i found these, with good prices on Egay

Eagle 5 and 7mm leads have "1300 ohms per metre"
http://www.eagleproducts.com.au/products_5_eliminator.php


Both the Ultra and Heavy Duty Series Eagle 8mm leads below have a resistance of "2,100 (+/-500) OHMs per metre"
http://www.eagleproducts.com.au/products_8_ultra.php3


Lpg 8mm leads give us "1,300±130 OHMS resistance per metre"
http://www.eagleproducts.com.au/products_8_eliminator_lpg.php


The Eagle 11mm plugs have a "Ultra low 325 ohms per metre"
http://www.eagleproducts.com.au/products_11_eliminator.php

Cheers, Matt

 

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 Post subject: Re: Ignition leads 8, 10 or 11mm?
Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 10:37 pm 
Getting Side Ways
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Location: Castlemaine
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"You can get top gun 10mm leads on ebay to suit the 6cyl they are not listed but just ask one of the guys that sell them for the v8's I think they were like 80 bucks or something like that I have them on my car didn't really notice a difference."

&

"Only difference between the 8.5 and 10mm leads is the thickness of the insulation. Big of a wank actually.
A standard Ford ignition system wont generate enough voltage for the thicker insulation to be required.
They look good but." http://www.fordmods.com/ford-4l-and-6-cylinder-f1/8-5-mm-leads-or-10-mm-leads-t87734.html

Any more thoughts, apart from the obvious details given on the Eagle site about stronger insulation and so forth. Is spacing the leads worth considering?

Cheers

 

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 Post subject: Re: Ignition leads 8, 10 or 11mm?
Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 10:45 pm 
Getting Side Ways
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"Claims of Horsepower Gain

Every brand of spiral conductor ignition wires will perform the function of conducting coil output to the spark plugs, but NONE, despite the claims made in advertisements and other promotional literature, will increase horsepower. Independent tests, including a test performed by Circle Track Magazine (see May, 1996 issue) in the USA, show that NO "low-resistance" ignition wires for which a horsepower increase is claimed do in fact increase horsepower - the test also included comparisons with solid metal and carbon conductor ignition wires."

"Electrical devices, including SPARK PLUGS, use only the electrical energy necessary to perform the function for which such devices are designed. IGNITION WIRES are nothing other than conductors, and whereas an ignition wire's inefficient or failing conductor or insulating jacket (particularly a jacket inside grounded metal shielding) can reduce the flow of electricity to the spark plug, an ignition wire that allegedly generates an "increase" in spark energy will have no effect on the spark jumping across the spark plug gap, as the energy consumed at the spark plug gap won't be any more than what is needed to jump the gap (e.g. a 25 watt light bulb won't use any more energy or produce any more light if it's screwed into a socket wired to supply current to a 100,000 watt light bulb).

Although most new ignition wires will perform the function of conducting coil output to the spark plug, what is important to sophisticated race engine preparers and owners of production vehicles with exhaust emission controls is EMI suppression. All electronic devices can be effected by EMI emitted from ignition wires, and the problem is often exacerbated by installing a high-output ignition system. As production vehicles age, engine management sensors and wiring deteriorate and become more susceptible to EMI radiating from improperly suppressed ignition wires. To be truly effective, ignition wires need to be EMI suppressed for a reasonable time, while having the ability to maintain good conductance without overloading other ignition system components."
http://www.magnecor.com/magnecor1/truth.htm

 

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