Fordmods Logo

Lightened flywheel materials 

 

Page 1 of 1 [ 6 posts ] 

 
 Post subject: Lightened flywheel materials
Posted: Sun Jun 28, 2009 11:21 am 
Getting Side Ways
Offline
User avatar

Age: 31

Posts: 11103

Joined: 15th Nov 2004

Ride: AU III XR8 Pursuit 250 ute

Location: Hobart
TAS, Australia

What is the effect of the difference between the materials used to make lightened flywheels?

Exedy make their Racing Flywheels out of solid one-piece forget chrome moly steel ( http://www.exedy.com.au/RacingFlywheel.aspx ).

Clutch Industries (PBR) RPM offered lightened flywheels from 3 different materials:
• Lightened Steel Flywheel
• Chrome Molybdenum (Chrome Molly) Flywheel
• Lightened Aluminium Flywheel
( http://ciperformance.com.au/flywheelspage.html )

Anyone know what effect the different materials have (i.e. do the steel ones last longer than the aluminium ones, but are heavier, etc?)?

 

_________________

Heaps of performance EF/L parts for sale, including supercharged VCT motor!

2002 Ford AU Series III Falcon XR8 Pursuit 250 ute - 5.6L of V8 Windsor!

Top
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject: Re: Lightened flywheel materials
Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 12:38 am 
Parts Gopher
Offline
User avatar

Age: 40

Posts: 76

Joined: 29th Nov 2007

Ride: turbo ed, xr6 turbo

Location: cairns
QLD, Australia

aluminium is expensive and usually for racing purposes only, steel flywheels are more durable and can be lightened accordingly, a few kilos can be taken off to reduce reciprocating mass. Revs up quicker but it can affect torque. Not something u guess at, talk to a machinest and tell him what u want to do with it.

 

_________________

If u can't fix it with a hammer, it's an electrical problem

Top
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject: Re: Lightened flywheel materials
Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 12:40 am 
Parts Gopher
Offline
User avatar

Age: 40

Posts: 76

Joined: 29th Nov 2007

Ride: turbo ed, xr6 turbo

Location: cairns
QLD, Australia

found this might explain easier :
In the quest for faster cars, many enthusiasts will have their flywheels lightened. Why? Because a lighter flywheel increases the rate of torque applied to the drive wheels. How? It increases the efficiency of the drivetrain by reducing inertia. This is important as it will accelerate you car faster than the identical engine with a heavier flywheel. Also, if you are going to lighten a flywheel, it's much more effective to remove weight from the outer edges than the interior. This is due to the "leveraging" effect that mass has from the center of rotation. Like an ice skater spinning with their arms out, and as they bring them in they spin faster - same energy, faster rotational speed.

The downside of this is that taking off from a dead start is more difficult, because there's less energy at the clutch (energy=(1/2) mass x velocity-squared (.5 x m x v^2)). Decrease the mass, increase the speed (revs). Underdrive pulleys and lighter wheels help acceleration using this same principle - no more torque at the crank, but delivered to the wheels faster. Lighter wheels have the same effect, but to a smaller degree.

 

_________________

If u can't fix it with a hammer, it's an electrical problem

Top
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject: Re: Lightened flywheel materials
Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 9:50 am 
Getting Side Ways
Offline
User avatar

Age: 31

Posts: 11103

Joined: 15th Nov 2004

Ride: AU III XR8 Pursuit 250 ute

Location: Hobart
TAS, Australia

I was reading about those aluminium ones, and they actually have a friction material on them, which is replaceable, so the aluminium flywheel should last forever, and you just replace the friction material. Might give them a call and ask about how they go in a street car.
Sort of similar concept to the rear sprocket that I use on my dirt bike - it's an aluminium sprocket with a steel ring gear riveted on - the maximum use of aluminium to make it as light as possible, but still using steel on the gear as you need the hard wearing surface so your not constantly changing the cog.

 

_________________

Heaps of performance EF/L parts for sale, including supercharged VCT motor!

2002 Ford AU Series III Falcon XR8 Pursuit 250 ute - 5.6L of V8 Windsor!

Top
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject: Re: Lightened flywheel materials
Posted: Mon Jun 29, 2009 2:18 pm 
Getting Side Ways
Offline
User avatar

Age: 28

Posts: 2515

Joined: 27th Mar 2006

Gallery: 1 images

Ride: FG MkII Xr6t Ute

Location: Brisbane
QLD, Australia

The i6 being a long stroke engine though will minimise the ill effect of a lighter flywheel.

Generally 4 cylinder jap engines on the other hand (having power strokes further apart and shorter strokes) can be noticably slower when taking off with a lighter flywheel due to the combined effect of their lack of torque and momentum of the lighter flywheel (or is it inertia? f**k, last physics was 4 years ago!).

Saw a 1 cyl industrial diesel engine once, has a long long stroke, but the power strokes being so far apart it required a seriously huge a** chunky flywheel.

 

_________________

EVL098 wrote:
Cramping in the hand from having it on your Wang for an excessive period of time is a definate con.
Seriously do people google "f**k up modifications for Fords owned by Jews" and get linked straight to this site nowadays?

AU,factory fitted tickford kit/IRS, t5,Sports ryder/KYB: gone.

Top
 Profile  
 
 
 Post subject: Re: Lightened flywheel materials
Posted: Tue Jul 21, 2009 11:02 pm 
Parts Gopher
Offline

Age: 48

Posts: 85

Joined: 3rd Mar 2006

Ride: EB GT fakey

Location: cairns
QLD, Australia

the lighter flywheel lets your engine rev up quicker and also slows down quicker so engine braking is a little more effective. my preference would be a single untreated material one as it would be more consistent for it's usable life
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:
Sort by  
 Page 1 of 1  [ 6 posts ] 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

 

 

It is currently Sat Dec 16, 2017 6:52 pm All times are UTC + 11 hours

 

 

(c)2014 Total Web Solutions Australia - Australian Web Hosting and Domain Names