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save hundreds of dollars GROUP BUY aftermarket ECU ? 28/8/07 

 

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Posted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 10:07 am 
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Hi again Luke,

I have only used Bosch 984 and now a Denso intank which have both been bigger than the standard one...I have noticed there is a difference and know of others that have upgraded wiring - horses for courses - if you dont' feel you need to, then that's all good :)

 

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 Post subject: Re: Wolf V500 group price for
Posted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 11:49 am 
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FPV_GTp wrote:
Wolf V500 group price for

plug'n'play is $1670-oo
universal kit is $1580-oo


this is a discount for a group purchase that I have listed.

A quotation for a group buy of 10 in one hit.

For this to happen I need the numbers guy

cheers

NB : eight injector drivers , can run sequential injections
eight ignition drivers , can run sequential ignition , waste spark


Hey Ivan,

How is this going? Did you end up getting enough numbers?
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Posted: Mon Jul 07, 2008 9:18 pm 
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Had a look at their website and Wolf are having a training day in Melb in August.

Not sure whether its open to the public or how much.

But if its possible it might be worth a look???

 

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 Post subject: Re: Wolf V500 group price for
Posted: Wed Aug 20, 2008 3:23 pm 
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Dansedgli wrote:
FPV_GTp wrote:
Wolf V500 group price for

plug'n'play is $1670-oo
universal kit is $1580-oo


this is a discount for a group purchase that I have listed.

A quotation for a group buy of 10 in one hit.

For this to happen I need the numbers guy

cheers

NB : eight injector drivers , can run sequential injections
eight ignition drivers , can run sequential ignition , waste spark


Hey Ivan,

How is this going? Did you end up getting enough numbers?


Ok Steve , nothing went as planned , group buy didn't meet the required amount to make it worth while , plenty of interest but when it come down to the crunch people didn't have their money ready

Guys just price around from the allocated dealers and see what you can get the programmable Wolf ECU's for and just drop me a PM and i will see what price I can negotiate for you.

cheers

 

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 Post subject: Special price FordMods Members aftermaket programmable ECU
Posted: Thu Dec 18, 2008 10:59 am 
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Date 18/12/2008


OK , quickly who would be interested in a group buy of aftermarket programmable ECU?????

The unit in question is Adaptronic e420c this is the current version. http://www.adaptronic.com.au/comp.php

Need 10 people to be part of the group buy to make this happen

Normal recommended retail price of the Adaptronic e420c ECU (does not include loom) - $990.00


Engine Management - ( Special Price FordMods Members )
Adaptronic e420c programmable ECU - $600 ( special price FordMods Members NEW UNIT )(does not include loom)

Looms - Flying
0.5m loom - $66.00
2.0m loom - $99.00

Igniters
Single Channel 'dumb' igniters - $50.00

MAP sensors (includes plug)
3 Bar - $88.00
1 Bar - $77.00

Freight Australia wide is between $10 to $20-oo Australia post.

For vehicles running coil pack ignition systems there are two channel , 3 channel and 4 channel coil igniters available.

cheers

 

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Posted: Sun Dec 21, 2008 1:10 pm 
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For under $760 + POSTAGE you can have a fully programmable ECU system , very user friendly

Ideal for boost appliaction with the additional 3 bar map sensor

need the numbers to make this possible

cheers

 

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 Post subject: Re: save hundreds of dollars GROUP BUY aftermarket ECU ? 28/8/07
Posted: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:39 am 
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Ok over the past weeks I've been getting emails from Wolf. This information might be of interested to some people planning on going with a Wolf ECU. This might aid in diagnosing faults and assist in tuning the Wolf engine management system on you vehicle.

This Material is not mine , I'm just simply sharing it . This was written by Steve Taylor

What is your future?‏

know it sounds like a bit of a weird subject line to come from a company dealing in engine management systems.

But what I want you to think about is - "What are the future uses of my vehicle, and do I have the correct parts on my vehicle to allow me to get to that point as easily as possible?"

It's probably a bigger question than a lot of people ask themselves when they are starting out modifying their vehicle.

There is usually an endpoint that each person modifying their vehicle wants to get to.

Most of the time there are many steps to go from Here And Now ........ To That End Point.

If you are an end user, you need to get good advise from people in the performance industry to ensure you are going the right way about getting your project through the steps required to achieve your final goal.

If you are a workshop, a mechanic, or installer, you want to give your customers the best advise to ensure they get to their final destination and remain extremely happy with the project and with you.

This is where a little planing in the beginning can ensure the smoothest path, and most efficient road to end up with your vehicle just the way you want it.

Here are a few questions you may ask yourself:

How much power do I ultimately want?

What is the final application of the vehicle (rally, drag, street, dyno comp, etc)?

What is the time-frame I am looking at for this project?

If you talk with your mechanic about the future of your vehicle now, he will be able to advise you far better on the path to take with your modifications.

Sometimes, that means not cutting corners now ( as it may cause there to be more work, and more expense later on). For example, using cheaper parts now that may need to be replaced in the future.

With workshop and customer working together, the very best result can be had for both parties.



What is the most important thing you think about when modifying your car?
Is it power?

Is it that you enjoy cruising around on a nice day?

Is it that you want to win in your racing class?

Whatever it is, it won't be nearly as good (as much fun) as it could be if your car doesn't start and run whenever you want to move it, or race it, or go cruising in it. Even if you have a full on drag car, the fun will quickly diminish if every time you try to start it, it fouls plugs, or you need to warm it up before you can move it, or put it on a transporter.

Tuning for maximum power is obviously what the owner of the vehicle usually wants. What you may not know, is that he also wants the vehicle to be as nice to start and to drive as possible. If you don't know that this is an import part of having fun with your vehicle, you may not talk to the engine tuner with this in mind.

Now, there will be limitations to how "nice" to drive you can make a fire-breathing 1/4 mile or racetrack stomper. But, you can optimize the tuning to get the most driveability out of every engine package.

As a customer, this will make you happy, and as a tuner, this will show your customers what a great tuner you are and they will be happy to tell their friends how great their car drives.

How do we achieve this? I'll be going through several of these tuning areas during future emails, so keep an eye out for them.

Timing Lights - Dial Back vs Fixed‏
Let's get straight into it. Most of us know that you cannot begin to even try to start an engine without a timing light (although many have tried in the past - including myself in my early days). But, without knowing that your ECU is delivering the ignition timing that you think it is delivering, at best you can guess what the real ignition timing is, and at worst you can potentially cause damage to your engine.

We don't want that.

So the first thing we have to do before we tune an engine - either dyno or track tuning, is to make sure the ignition timing the ECU is displaying corresponds to where the engine is when the spark event occurs. That is: If the ECU says 10 degrees BTDC, the spark event must be 10 degrees BTDC. If it is not, change the ECU configuration so it is correct.

Just quickly though, there is one thing to test. Even though you have the correct ignition timing at idle, what is to say that it is correct at say, 3,000 RPM? With modern ECU's being so configurable, you must check the ignition timing at 2 RPM points. If the timing is correct at both RPM's you are good-to-go.

If the timing is not correct at both RPM's you may have a configuration problem, or a triggering issue.

OR - Let's get back to what was written in the subject line of this email.

There are two main types of timing lights. Dial Back, and Fixed.

Fixed Timing Lights just flash when the spark event occurs. They may have a button or a trigger, but they have no smarts to make working out the actual ignition timing easier.

As you will see, this may be an advantage.

Dial Back Timing Light - either with a rotating knob, or buttons. These are the top of the line timing lights.

But they do have one problem:- If you have a wasted spark ignition system, either with dual output coils, or individual coils fired twice per engine cycle, a dial back timing light may show you the INCORRECT ignition timing. and worse still, this is not an offset from the real timing, it varies depending on the engine RPM.

This is due to the fact that the timing light is using the speed of the ignition pulses to determine the engine RPM. And it uses that engine speed to work out how long to delay the flash event so it shows on its display or dial, what the ignition timing is. Since it thinks the engine is running twice as fast as it actually is, it cannot determine what the CORRECT ignition timing actually is.

I have seen seasoned mechanics have trouble with this many times over the years. It is more common than you may think.

The basic symptom is that they have set the timing, and it is correct at idle, but when they rev up the engine, the timing changes away from what the ECU is saying it is delivering.

So. Make sure you either use a fixed timing light, or, set the dial back to zero if you are checking the ignition timing of any engine running any type of waste-spark ignition system.

If you'd like some more info on Tools for EFI Diagnostics, you can have a look at http://www.wolfems.com/support/EFIFuelI ... Tools.html . There is info on Timing Lights, Pressure Gauges and Multimeters.






Increasing Fuel Pressure‏
We all know that increasing fuel pressure means you get more fuel per squirt right?

Well that is mostly true.

The first problem is, that as we increase the fuel pressure (using an adjustable fuel pressure regulator), the extra amount of fuel coming out of the injector does not necessarily increase proportionally. And this only gets worse as you keep increasing the pressure higher, and higher. The higher you go, the less of an increase in fuel flow you are achieving.

The second problem is that you can end up with the fuel pressure on the back of the injector making it harder for the injector to open. This can cause idle problems. This is especially true with high impedance injectors where there is not a lot of injector opening current to overcome the fuel pressure on the back of the injector.

Thirdly, you can have other problems such as less efficient injector spray, and injectors leaking when the engine is not running, but there is still fuel pressure in the rail.

Now, this all depends on the type of injectors you are using, but the general rules apply.

So, what is the answer?

Make sure you have the correctly sized injectors to cope with the amount of power you are trying to achieve. DON'T just screw the pressure up more and more. If you are getting fuel pressure up to numbers like 55-60 PSI at idle, that may end up being a lot more by the time you are at atmospheric pressure, or even more under high boost pressure levels.

Maybe take some advice from someone in the industry who has experience with a project like yours. It's far better to ask and get some solid advice, than it is to go the wrong way and end up with a substandard result.






Boost Pressure Over Road Speed‏ -

Now, I know a lot of people reading this don't have a turbo-charged engine.

But that does not mean that they wont in the future. So even if you don't currently run a turbo engine, you still may find this email of interest.

A lot of high powered turbo cars have too much power in the lower gears. This can actually make the car slower than if it had less power, as the driver needs to spend more time reducing engine power (with his right foot), than getting on with the job of driving.

Using Road Speed as a reference to map boost with allows you to optimize engine power at different speeds.

To do this, you will need an ECU with a wheel speed input, and the ECU will need the ability to map the boost valve position vs road speed or wheel speed.

Most EFI cars have an electronic speedo, so you can pick up on that for your wheel speed.

That is a pretty quick and easy way to get wheel speed into your ECU, but it does not address one thing. That the "driven wheels" may be spinning at 100 kph, but the vehicle is actually standing still.

So, to get the best (and most accurate) result, you would be best to have a wheel speed sensor on an "undriven" wheel.

That will show the real road speed, and allow you to maximize your vehicle's acceleration so you can concentrate on winning the race, beating the time, or just having more fun.

As a side note, you can also map boost against throttle position to have the engine power delivered in a more linear manner as you open the throttle.

If you have any specific questions about turbo boost over road speed, you can contact us at wolfemail@wolfems.com.au

Clean Injectors‏ -

What can dirty injectors do to your engine?
Cause Idle Problems - misfires at idle, lumpy idle, inconsistent idle speed.

Limit Maximum Power - In some cases, dirty injectors can cause the air fuel ratio to vary across your cylinders to the point of limiting the maximum power your engine can produce.

Cause Engine Damage - In very extreme cases, you can have a cylinder lean-out to the point of piston damage. This is a rare and extreme case, but it can happen.

What do you need to know?
New injectors should flow within 0.5% of each other.

Cleaned injectors should flow within 2-3% of each other, MAX. Anything above 3% means you may experience one or more of the symptoms above. They really should be within 1% for any serious performance application.

You must also ensure your set of injectors all have the same spray pattern, as you might have injectors that all flow within 2% of each other, but you may have 1 injector that has a bad spray pattern. Putting this injector into your engine will probably mean you might at least have rough idle.

The bottom line is, that if you want to get the most out of your engine, you must ensure you have a good set of clean injectors.
Look at it this way: If you have 4 tires on your car, and 3 of them are inflated to 36PSI, but one of them is inflated to 29PSI, you could not expect your car to handle nearly as well as when all of the tires are inflated to 36PSI.

Cleaning a set of injectors generally only cost between $100 and $200, so it is very cheap insurance when you consider the amount you may spend on your vehicle to modify it.

 

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 Post subject: Re: save hundreds of dollars GROUP BUY aftermarket ECU ? 28/8/07
Posted: Sun Mar 22, 2009 12:13 pm 
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CDI Ignition Systems‏

More and more people are running engines that demand more and more from their ignition system.

Most standard ignition systems are of the inductive type. These ignition systems can generally handle up to 15PSI of boost pressure, sometimes a little more, sometimes a little less. Gapping plugs down is not the best answer by any stretch of the imagination. Reduced plug gap can lead to a rough idle and increased fuel consumption.

The next step above inductive ignition systems is Capacitor Discharge Ignition (CDI).

Within the CDI range, there are also different levels of CDI units available. Some are made for road, some for race, and others are drag racing only. It is important to use the most appropriate ignition system for your application. So, if you are not sure, ask someone how knows.

Now, CDI systems do tend to emit a lot of radio frequency noise. To reduce this noise (that can affect other electronic devices on the vehicle), you must use twisted pairs of wire for both the main power and ground wires, as well as the pairs of wires going to each ignition coil. One step beyond twisted pairs is to use twisted shielded wire.

The ultimate version of twisted shielded wire is Tefzel (aircraft grade wire). When we build a custom loom for a customer we often use Tefzel wire when the customer wants the very best. It doesn't cost the earth, and the result is an outstanding loom.

 

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